Bye Bye Nausea

Pregnancy is an amazing ride, but the morning sickness that often comes with it? Not so fabulous?

According to research, approximately 70 percent of women experience nausea and about 50 percent experience vomiting. It's very, very common, but it's also different. Lots of people are sick all day, some are sick mostly in the evening, and others are sick if they haven't gotten enough sleep. Morning sickness can start as early as six weeks into pregnancy and tends to peak around the eighth and ninth weeks.

So how to deal with it?

Ditch Work

Take a sick day and give yourself a break. Your body's working overtime on growing that baby -- you deserve it.

Even better, schedule a "vacation" during your seventh or eighth week, when morning sickness generally starts to peak and the time off will help you recoup, both physically and mentally.

Stop and Smell the Roses

Certain scents will turn your tummy. Morning sickness is often smell-associated, estrogen is the hormone that's responsible for the sense of smell, and if you're a high estrogen hormone person -- like when you're pregnant -- you have the radar nose of pregnancy. Ugly smells, smells you can't get away from, and potent smells will make you nauseous. When you can't open a window or walk away, try sniffing fresh scents. Carry a bottle of lemon extract or a sprig of fresh rosemary in your bag.

Speak Up

Being vocal about your feelings to those around you can help alleviate morning sickness misery. Your hubs probably doesn't know that his scented soap makes you queasy, so tell him and let him know what little changes he can make to help you feel better. And when your mood improves, he'll feel better too.

Stay Hydrated

It sounds like a no-brainer, but getting your eight glasses a day can feel like a monumental effort when your stomach won't keep anything down. Despite that, it's essential to get your liquids in because the more dehydrated you become, the more nauseated you'll become.

Eat a Little -- and Then a Little More

Even if eating is the last thing you want to do, you need to get food into your stomach -- it's just a matter of figuring out what. "Every mom -- and every queasy tummy -- is different. What spells relief to one may spell P-U-K-E to another. Fatty and spicy foods may upset iffy stomachs, but if you find that they work for you, by all means, go ahead and eat them.

Get Creative with Ginger

Ginger is a stomach soother, and studies have shown that it may help quell the queasies. Try adding a thin slice of ginger to hot water or tea, or sipping flat ginger ale.

Adjust Your Computer

You may think that surfing the web will distract you from morning sickness, but the computer's bright screen and undetectable strobe effect may make you more nauseated. Make the font size bold and larger, and change the background to a soft pink or tan. Take short breaks from the computer by getting up to do something else -- or by simply closing your eyes.

Carry a Survival Kit

No matter how many times it happens, puking in public is not something you ever get used to. But to make the sticky situation bearable, don't leave home without stocking your bag with a few morning sickness must-haves: toothbrush, toothpaste, or bottle of mouthwash to help you freshen up post-puke.

Now that you have these tips to help you through the first trimester, you can feel better and focus on baby.